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Egypt protesters torch Muslim Brotherhood offices

 

Protesters in Egypt have set fire to Muslim Brotherhood offices in several cities, according to state TV. They were demonstrating against President Mohammed Mursi’s decision to grant himself sweeping new powers. His decree states, among other things, that the president’s decisions cannot be revoked by any authority – including the judiciary.

Rival rallies have been held across the country today by supporters and opponents of Mr Mursi. In the Suez Canal cities of Suez, Port Said and Ismailia opponents of the Islamist president reportedly set fire to the offices of the Muslim Brotherhood. Clashes have also been reported between opposing demonstrations in the Mediterranean city of Alexandria.

Source: BBC.

 

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بعد رفض الرئيس تطهيرها .. أحمد دياب ضحية جديدة للداخلية

توجه كلا من أحمد دياب -خريج كلية حقوق- ومازن إسماعيل -حارس مرمى منتخب مصر لكرة اليد- لقسم المطرية بصحبة قريب لهما لتحرير محضر، وأثناء أخذ أقوال قريبهما من قِبل ملازم ب. ث…

يحكي أحمد دياب: تكلم مازن بدون إذن.. مما أثار استياء ملازم ب. ودفعه لسب الدين قائلا: “بـ*** أمك مش عاوز أسمع صوت *** أمك، يا تقف ساكت يا تخرج برة القسم”
اعترض مازن على الصراخ وسب الدين قائلا: “ماينفعش حضرتك تتكلم معايا كدة، اتكلم معايا باحترام”.
يواصل أحمد:  فوجئنا بملازم ب. يدفع مكتبه، ويدفع مازن ويتهجم عليه ويصفعه على وجهه ويسب الدين مرة أخرى قائلا: “أكلمك إزاي بـ*** أمك”.. ثم قام بسحله من مكتبه -تحت حماية أفراد القسم- حتى باب القسم ودفعه خارجا وأخد يضربه “بالشلاليت”!
خرجت وراء مازن، استدار الملازم “فلقاني في وشه”.. وصرخ: “إنت مين ب*** أمك إنت كمان”؟ وصفعني على وجهي مرتين ودفعني أرضا.
صرخت فيه مدافعا عن نفسي: “وحياة ربنا لاطلع على إدارة التفتيش أعمل لك محضر”.. فرد عليّ بضربة على عيني بقمع المرور!
قررنا أنا ومازن أن نغادر، فأمر بحجزنا في القسم قائلا: “هاتولي ولاد الـ**** دول إرموهملي في الحجز”.
أمضينا في الحجز ساعتين، حتى حضر ضابط المباحث الذي قام بدوره بالتحريض قائلا: “مزعل نفسك ليه يا ب. باشا، اعمل لهم محضر إنهم اتهجموا على القسم”!
خرجنا بعد فترة وتوجهت إلي مستشفى حكومي لاثبات الإصابة، رفضت المستشفى عمل التقرير الطبي عندما علموا أنه تم الاعتداء علي من قِبل ضابط بالقسم.
توجهت إلى مستشفى خاص، استلمت تقريرا طبيا عن إصابة عيني وذهبت به إليه وكيل نيابة بالتجمع الخامس الذي أبدى تعاونا معنا ونصحنا بعمل مذكرة سنتوجه بها إلى مأمور قسم المطرية.
هذه الواقعة بتفاصيلها نضعها أما وزير الداخلية، الذي طلب من الإعلام من قبل عدم ذكر سلبيات جهاز الشرطة حتى لا يؤثر ذلك على معنوياتهم.
نرجو التحقيق الجاد في هذه الواقعة التي ليست بالأولى وربما لا تكون الأخيرة.
كما نرجو من رئيس الجمهورية إعادة النظر في مسألة رفض تطهير الداخلية.

المصدر: شبكة 6 ابريل

Egyptians head to the polls for first vote since historic revolt


Egyptians headed to the polls Monday to vote in the first election since an improbable revolt toppled one of the world’s longest-serving rulers.

Hundreds of people lined up on one street in downtown Cairo, all waiting patiently to vote in the country’s parliamentary elections.

“This is the first time in 55 years that I (can) vote,” said Sharif Shinawi, a 55-year-old businessman. “It was never in the history of Egypt, since Adam and Eve, that we’ve had this opportunity. I am willing to wait 10 hours, or until tomorrow morning if I have to, but I will vote.”

In Cairo’s el Manial neighborhood, Mohamed Rida’a Mohamed Abdulla beamed as he left a polling station.

“Before, there was always cheating. Now, I could be wrong, but I think my vote will count,” the electrical engineer said. He said he refused to vote for members of ousted President Hosni Mubarak‘s disbanded National Democratic Party, and said he also wouldn’t vote for the Muslim brotherhood — “even though I have a beard and I am a very good Muslim. I voted for a middle party.”

Polls opened at 8 a.m. (1 a.m. ET ) for the first of many rounds to decide who will sit in the upper and lower houses of parliament.

Meanwhile, crowds continued to gather in Cairo’s Tahrir Square, where protesters have demanded change since early this year. They overthrew Mubarak in February — a major victory in the Arab Spring uprisings — and are now calling for his military replacements to step aside.

Tour guide Mohamed Ali, like many Egyptians, is torn between the ballot box and a revolution he feels is incomplete.

“The election — it’s the chance now,” Ali said. “I’ll go (vote) — and (then) I’m back in the square.”

Problems surfaced in some polling areas. Fliers supporting various parties were handed out in parts of Cairo, in violation of election laws. Some people standing in line used them to fan themselves.

“Yes, there has been some limited reports of campaigning outside polls, which is illegal, but the military contained the situation and stopped them or confiscated their campaigning material,” election committee official Abdel Moez Ibrahim said.

He said in general, the election process seemed to be going smoothly, but “major reports of irregularities are related to (the) late opening of some polls.”

Ibrahim said such polls would stay open late Monday evening for the same number of hours for which they were delayed.

Activist Yousri Kamal said ballots had yet to arrive at one polling station in Cairo, hours after polls opened.

“Many people are angry and are starting to leave,” Kamal said.

‘At a critical crossroads’

On the eve of Monday’s election, the head of the Supreme Council of the Armed Forces — Egypt’s current ruling body — urged Egyptians to vote and warned of “dire consequences” if the nation’s political crisis continues, state-run Al-Masriya TV reported.

Some 50 million people are eligible to take part in the historic election.

“Please go and vote because we want a parliament that is well balanced from all the parties and groups. The elections will not be successful until everyone who has a right to vote participates. Egypt is at a critical crossroads. It either succeeds, or Egypt will face dire consequences,” said Field Marshal Hussein Tantawi.

Elections for the lower house are scheduled to take place in three stages, the last one of which is set for January. Upper house elections will run between January and March.

Egyptians have dozens of political parties and thousands of independent candidates to choose from. The once-banned Muslim Brotherhood, one of the nation’s largest organizations, is expected to perform well in the election.

The polling is taking place against the backdrop of demonstrations calling for an immediate end to military rule.

At least 42 people have been killed in clashes over the past two weeks, including at least 33 in Cairo. An additional 3,250 have been wounded, according to the health ministry.

The Supreme Council of the Armed Forces said presidential elections will be held by June. Military leaders say they will hand over power to a new government when one is elected. The Supreme Council of the Armed Forces, Egypt’s current ruling body, said presidential elections will be held by June.

“I fought for these elections in Tahrir Square and even got shot, but I am boycotting them completely. I don’t trust the military one bit … It’s a farce and more people will die in the next two days,” said Omar Ahmed, a taxi driver.

Egypt TV reported that 33 candidates from the revolution that ousted Mubarak have withdrawn their candidacy in protest of the current political circumstances.

Others expressed confidence and said they are excited about the opportunity to help decide the country’s direction. The streets are full of election banners — a strong sign of democracy in a country ruled for 30 years by Mubarak’s iron fist.

“I believe the election is a good thing. … If we are lucky, maybe we’ll get rid of Tantawi,” said activist Ashraf Nagi.

‘Will never turn back’

Like Ahmed, analysts have warned of increased violence if the vote is not considered legitimate by most.

The elections in Egypt are being closely watched as the nation is the most populous country in the Arab world and a major player in regional politics. Whatever becomes of the revolution here will have wider repercussions.

“It is easy to imagine a spiraling of unrest and violence if elections are perceived as illegitimate by a significant number of Egyptians or, worse, delayed altogether,” Shadi Hamid, an analyst at the Qatar-based branch of the Brookings Institution, wrote recently.

“Since its revolution, Egypt has not had even one national body with real legitimacy. Legitimacy requires elections, which is why the upcoming polls are so critical for both Egyptians and everyone else who wishes to see Egypt move toward democracy and some modicum of stability,” he said.

The country’s military rulers recently appointed Kamal Ganzouri, who served under Mubarak, to his former role as prime minister. He was chosen after then-Prime Minister Essam Sharaf and his government quit en masse, extending months of upheaval and instability.

“I think we’ve had peaks and we’ve had downs. Right now, we’re having another peak. Unfortunately, maybe it’s not the peak we hope for at a time like this,” said Mohamed Ghoneim, another activist.

But, he added: “I definitely think the wheel that has gone in motion … will never turn back.”

source:www.cnn.com

Egypt’s elections: What will happen and what’s at stake

Demonstrators worry the military, which would continue as Egypt's top authority until a president is in place, wants to keep power.

For the first time since the end of President Hosni Mubarak‘s 30-year rule, Egyptians will be able to choose their representatives to the nation’s parliament. Here’s a look at what’s at stake, how the process will unfold and why some are boycotting the elections.

Q. What are the different stages of the parliamentary elections?

Monday marks the beginning of many rounds of elections for both the upper and lower houses of parliament.

Voting will be carried out in waves — in different months and in different governorates — around the country up until March.

Elections for the lower house are scheduled to take place in three stages, the last one of which is set for January.

Upper house elections will run between January and March, and a presidential vote will follow.

Q. How many parties and candidates are participating?

Egyptians have dozens of political parties and thousands of independent candidates to choose from.

Two-thirds of the seats will be filled by parties, and the other third by open candidates.

The once-banned Muslim Brotherhood, one of the nation’s largest organizations, is expected to perform well in the election, which is taking place against the backdrop of demonstrations calling for an immediate end to military rule.

Q. Why are demonstrators still angry?

Demonstrators say they are concerned the military, which would continue to be Egypt’s top authority until a president is in place, wants to keep a grip on the country.

Many also have voiced anger about a proposed constitutional principle that would shield the military’s budget from scrutiny by civilian powers.

Military leaders say they will hand over power to a new government when one is elected. The Supreme Council of the Armed Forces, Egypt’s current ruling body, said presidential elections will be held by June.

Q. How deadly have recent clashes been?

At least 42 people have been killed in the recent demonstrations, including at least 33 in Cairo. An additional 3,250 have been wounded, according to Egypt’s health ministry.

Q. What’s at stake in these elections?

Egypt is the most populous country in the Arab world and a major player in regional politics. The outcome of its revolution will have wider repercussions.

“It is easy to imagine a spiraling of unrest and violence if elections are perceived as illegitimate by a significant number of Egyptians,” Shadi Hamid, an analyst at the Qatar-based branch of the Brookings Institution, wrote recently.

Hamid added that the elections “are so critical for both Egyptians and everyone else who wishes to see Egypt move toward democracy and some modicum of stability.”

Q. How do Egyptians feel about the elections?

Some Egyptians are boycotting the parliamentary elections while others say they are excited about the opportunity.

“I fought for these elections in Tahrir Square and even got shot, but I am boycotting them completely,” taxi driver Omar Ahmed said. “I don’t trust the military one bit … It’s a farce.”

But some are hopeful in the streets full of election banners — a strong sign of democracy in a country ruled for 30 years by Mubarak’s iron fist.

“I believe the election is a good thing,” activist Ashraf Nagi said. “If we are lucky, maybe we’ll get rid of (Hussein) Tantawi,” chairman of the military council.

source:www.cnn.com

Egypt battles show revolution’s unfinished business

When Egyptian President Hosni Mubarak stepped down in February, tens of thousands packed into Cairo‘s Tahrir Square to declare victory and a new beginning. Nine months later, thousands have returned to the same spot, calling for something similar: the resignation of the country’s military leadership.

The violence once again gripping the Egyptian capital shows that the uprising the world watched months ago was only a step on a long road, analysts said Monday.

“The revolution is unfinished,” said Samer Shehata, an Egypt expert with Georgetown University.

Robin Wright of the U.S. Institute of Peace said Egypt’s uprising is in “phase two” — and highlights a broad reality of the so-called Arab Spring.

“This is far more complicated than simply ousting a single leader,” she said. “This is about creating a whole new order in the region.”

Protesters are standing up against the military rulers who officially took over after Mubarak’s ouster.

After having held a great deal of power under Mubarak, the military openly took control.

Military leaders have said they will transfer power to an elected government. But while the complex electoral process is set to begin with next week’s parliamentary elections, the presidential vote could be a year away.

Protesters say they fear that the entrenched military, which served under Mubarak, is working to maintain a grip on society.

While protests have been common in Egypt in recent weeks, the tensions have boiled over since Saturday with clashes between security forces and protesters.

Four days later, the demonstrators showed no signs of letting down after violence that had left 24 people dead and at least 1,700 wounded, according to Health Ministry spokesman Dr. Adil al-Dawi. About 100 police officers and conscripts, meanwhile, had been hurt, an Interior Ministry spokesman said.

Many in the streets are furious about a proposed constitutional change that would shield the military’s budget from scrutiny by civilian powers. They say they worry the military would be shaped as a state within a state.

“The real question is the role of the military in Egypt,” said Shibley Telhami of the University of Maryland and the Brookings Institution.

“A lot of the segments of society — the forces behind the revolution — want that to be decided now rather than later,” he said.

Mistrust of the military has expanded in recent months, he said. In the earlier days after Mubarak’s ouster, the military “was careful” to give demonstrators “enough to defuse” tensions, Telhami said. But military rulers “have grown far more confident over the past three months” and less responsive to demands, he said.

The protesters appear to want their voices heard now to ensure the military does not avoid civilian oversight.

“I think that this is undoubtedly a defining moment,” Telhami said.

Last week, Telhami released the results of a survey, conducted in October, that found 43% of Egyptians believe military rulers are working to slow or reverse gains of the revolution, while 21% say military rulers want to advance those gains.

Georgetown’s Shehata said the opposition is divided over the electoral process ahead. Some elements want elections to proceed as scheduled, while others say they don’t trust the process to be free of military influence, and that any elections now would be farcical.

“The revolution has been subverted by the military,” Shehata said.

Egypt can build a functioning democracy and “has the institutions necessary for democracy,” he said.

“It’s not that (the Egyptian people) are incapable of being democratic. It’s that the forces that are opposed to them right now have the guns.”

Wright said the confrontation under way in Cairo “has been looming for a long time because the military has refused to follow through on its own promises to facilitate Egypt’s transition to democracy.”

Military rulers extended martial law and pushed back presidential elections, while implementing a parliamentary electoral system that “may rank as the most complicated in the world — and is ripe for manipulation,” she said. “And it has tried critics of its actions in military courts.”

She added, “The military’s moves to try to quell the phase two of Egypt’s uprising — whether through the use of force or tepid and unconvincing political compromises — only make the situation more combustible.”

The events in Egypt serve as a reminder that protest movements in other Arab nations are still “in an early phase,” Wright said. “There’s a lot more turmoil ahead.”

 source:www.cnn.com